Why You May Need a Lawyer for a Landlord-Tenant Dispute

By |2017-09-23T21:45:05+00:00September 10th, 2013|Real Estate Law|

At times a landlord and their tenants may argue about issues regarding rent, noise violations, lease issues and improper upkeep of the property. If the dispute cannot be resolved amicably then a real estate law attorney may need to intervene in order to prevent the issue from escalating and also ensure that you are protected as a renter.

What Are a Tenant’s Rights?

Tenants have rights, and when they are violated a lawyer may be needed. By understanding what rights you have as a tenant, you may be able to prevent being taken advantage of. Contact a Brent D. George Law if you experience any of the following:

  • Unlawful Discrimination – By law, a landlord cannot reject your rental application or refuse to rent to you as a way to discriminate or harass due to your race, religion, sexual orientation, marital status, sex or disability. It is also illegal for a landlord to refuse to rent on the basis that a family has young children, unless they are trying to rent a location in a senior citizen housing development.
  • The Property is Not Habitable – It is the responsibility of the landlord to ensure that the property is habitable. If damage has occurred to the premises that the tenant did not cause, then the landlord cannot legally charge them for repairs. A property is not habitable if doors and windows are broken, the house is not properly waterproofed, plumbing does not work properly, the gas lines are damaged or not working and the grounds and building are occupied by waste, rodents or vermin. These represent only a few signs of an uninhabitable rental property so it is best to speak with a real estate law attorney, like Brent George, if you feel that your property falls under this category.
  • Entering Your Premises Without Warning – Unless it is an emergency, a landlord cannot enter a tenant’s rental unit without reasonable advanced warning. The tenant must be given a notice at least 24 hours in advance that clearly indicates the date and time that the landlord will be entering the property, as well as the reason for entry. Furthermore, it is illegal for the landlord to enter the home outside of regular business hours. If the notice is sent by mail then the landlord must account for the time it takes to process the mail.

Laws are designed to protect tenants from landlords who may try and take advantage of them. Before a landlord tries to evict you or unlawfully collect funds that you are not obligated to pay, contact Brent D. George Law. We will work to help you better understand your rights as a tenant. Contact Brent D. George today for a Free Initial Consultation.